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The Autobiography of a Traitor and a Half-Savage: An Annotated Bibliography

fisk_mississippi_meandersIf you haven’t already seen my undignified squealing on social media: I have a story up at Tor.com. It’ll also be available as part of Some of the Best of Tor.com, the free ebook. It’s an anticolonial fantasy about American empire-building and indigenous knowledge and landscapes that fight back.

It also has a whole fictional bibliography of nineteenth-century travel narratives, partially based on genuine imperial travel narratives. Since so many people have been clamoring for more information on this (read: since I spent a long time researching it), I thought I’d publish an annotated bibliography to accompany the story. Here’s the full list of everything I cited and why: (more…)

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Kaleidoscope

KaleidoscopeCoverA rustling sound in the tall grasses–suddenly, a blogger emerges from the undergrowth, straggle-haired and tattered–“I have a new review!” she whispers, before disappearing back into the brush, not to emerge for months.

This has been a Jumanji-like retelling of my experience as a blogger. I like to read books, and I like to review them, but I also like to disappear into the gaps of the interwebs and lurk for months, or reread books I don’t want to review, or just lie in the June sun and forget that the internet is even a thing.

But I did write this review for Strange Horizons a few weeks ago, and forgot to post it! Kaleidoscope is a lovely anthology, that does lovely things, including teaching me how to spell ‘kaleidoscope.” Kallidoscope. Kaliedescope. Fuck.

Enjoy!

The Angel of Losses

angel of lossesA new review of Stephanie Feldman’s Crawford-prize-winning theological fantasy, The Angel of Losses, over at Strange Horizons!

Once (in New York City) upon a time (about now), there were two sisters named Marjorie and Holly. Their unexceptional middle-class childhoods were shadowed only by their grandfather’s eerie, haunting bedtime stories—about the White Rebbe, about ghostly young boys haunting Old World villages, about the Sabbath Light and the Angel of Losses.

Stephanie Feldman’s debut novel The Angel of Losses is like that: A delicate mix of mysticism and modernity, folktale and history. It’s a book made of opposites. Half the narrative is a present-day family drama about a woman renegotiating her relationships with her sister and her grandfather—light, mundane, modern. But the other half is a dark, mystical examination of sacrifice, and the cost of love. It’s this grimmer, eerier side that makes the book so worth reading…….More over at Strange Horizons!

February 17, 2015

Short and Sweet Banner copy

Winter has come to Kentucky. And before you northerners chuckle to yourselves and say “those poor bastards wouldn’t know winter if it danced naked in a snowdrift with christmas ornaments in its hair,” let me tell you: it’s our biggest snowfall in 17 years and it’s not getting above freezing until Saturday. It counts. So, the first story this week is fittingly titled, “In Winter.” (more…)

Administrating Imaginary Empires: Ancillary Sword and The Goblin Emperor

Ancillary_Sword_Orbit_coverThis is not a ploy to review two books at once because I’m like a thousand books in review-debt. I swear.[1]

Instead, this is what happens when you read a super-sci-fi-y story about spaceships, aliens, and AI, then switch to a classically fantasy story with goblins and elves, and find out they’re actually fascinatingly similar books with a lot to say about power, empire, and administration.

Both of them delighted me. Both of them disappointed me. Both of them are worth reading. (more…)